Ogararu will lose games as a coach, but should never lose our respect

September 18, 2014 Leave a comment

u clujMihai Nesu‘s everyday life is a physical struggle after the horrific accident suffered years ago, but his intelligence and passion for football are still in one place. So, it’s not pity what got him the job as a video analyst for Universitatea Cluj from the new coach in charge, George Ogararu. It’s just something you can’t find these days (actually, for decades) at his former club, Steaua Bucharest: true friendship and respect from an open-minded person in charge.
To both of them I sincerely wish the best of luck. And let’s just secretly keep our fingers crossed for Universitatea Cluj, no matter the team we support. There’s a spirit within that club strong enough not to be perverted by the promise of quick success brought to town in recent years by CFR, a spirit that sets this club apart and gestures like Ogararu’s just fit right in…

A look at Hagi’s struggles with the best Romanian football academy

September 15, 2014 Leave a comment

Viitorul started its third consecutive season in the top flight, which is quite a feature considering the impressive number of youngsters promoted, but also the difficulties to survive in a league full of clubs ready to throw everything into a fight that usually has one true victim: the future of Romanian football.
Hagi entered this fight with his best kids and intentions, but soon realized all his work and huge investment – done mostly by himself – can go to waste, so Viitorul has now linked to its name some shocking, yet very useful results obtained at the very end of the previous two Liga 1 campaigns.
It was not pretty to watch and it surely didn’t send the right signals not only within the club, but also outside of it. But what father wouldn’t try everything to protect his children?

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The real problem, in my opinion, is not that Hagi felt the need to intervene, as he does now, by taking an active role in the technical staff of his own club, is that he failed to address some important issues, which regard both the Academy’s activity and the senior team’s results.

1. No real solution for players who turn 19.
The youth competitions – which Hagi’s Academy dominate for years – involve only players up to 19 years old. Once the youngsters reach this critical age in their development, there’s no Under 21 or Reserve League games waiting for them. Hagi probably hoped to address that when he supported Gheorghe Popescu’s candidacy, but the former Barcelona captain ended the race in jail, not in the Romanian Football Federation’s best office.
There was no plan B. There are no partner-clubs in the second division, there are no friendly relations with other Liga 1 clubs, where most of his 19 years old, champions at youth level, could have a chance to take the normal step towards senior football. Viitorul is the only senior club to aspire to and it simply cannot look after and promote every generation of new players that comes out of the academy each year.

2. Too much confidence in the Academy’s potential to promote itself.
Initially, Hagi didn’t want a club in the tip flight, but was forced to push for promotion, as he felt that the second division is not a glamorous shopping avenue for interesting clubs, not even Romanian 1st division teams. He had to stop the investment in the training facilities near Constanta to be able to finance the club, but I am not sure that things are that much better. A look at some of the top sales done so far? Chitu to Valenciennes (failed to adjust, now returned to Romania), Balasa to Roma (loaned in Serie B), Iancu to Steaua (failed to impress)… Not very good advertising, is it?

3. Poor marketing and reluctance to work with agents.
Probably Hagi relies on his name, on the impressive number of youth internationals (the U21 just lost 0-8 to Germany…) and surely lacks in his club structure the people who can attract and keep alive the little interest of foreign clubs. On the other hand, he also ignores the good (which often comes with some bad, but not always!) that can be done by agents who know how to sell players.
I’ll offer one example I’ve been watching from a distance: Adrian Stefanescu, a Romanian agent who has very good links with top UK based clubs, including Manchester City, but who does some really good work in getting very young Romanian players in cont(r)act and with Premier League and Championship clubs. Atletico Arad, who does some good work at youth level, are lucky and also clever to have him as partner…

4. Poor selection of first team coaches
Viitorul promoted under the guidance of Catalin Anghel, an unknown, young coach, who has left the club after the first year in the top flight. His choice looked strange in the first place and it set a pattern Hagi hasn’t abandoned. Same goes for Bogdan Vintila, former keeper and colleague of the owner, who was followed and now follows after Bogdan Stelea, whose brief spell in charge means that Hagi didn’t really had to appoint himself in a technical role a couple of weeks ago. My feeling is that he was already making use of those prerogatives…
Anyway, having young, unexperienced and not so strict coaches in charge of a young and unexperienced team might not be the best idea, but until proven wrong, it seems like the only and the best idea.

5. Belief in wasted talents
Viitorul works every day with something than can be seen, felt in a player, but that cannot always be transformed into quality. It’s a process that involved hundreds of players since the academy opened its doors, thousands of hours spent on the pitch, millions of Euros invested and a bunch of subjective factors that can influence the outcome and make the work at youth level such a massive task which most of Romanian clubs simply refuse to undertake anymore.
Why Viitorul, who produces talent in quantities way over the senior team’s needs, decides every once in a while to sign players who proved at every level that they couldn’t turn themselves into quality professional players is simply beyond me. But, normally, it’s strictly linked with Hagi who – proved it also as a coach – really believes in his instincts (I cannot call stubborn a man I can’t stop admiring). Signing players like Alibec and Daminuta, whose real talent is to throw away the fantastic opportunities to make a huge career in football, made no sense to me. If Daminuta came on a free and, in theory, might allow Viitorul to make some money, Alibec was signed on loan from Inter, offered the place deserved by one of Viitorul’s kids, and made a mess of it once again. Now he’s warming the bench of Astra Giurgiu, after his probably last loan spell in Serie A, with Bologna.
Trying to find a logic in these signings? Maybe Hagi wanted to show his Academy graduates how they must not look like in 2-3 years time. Full of tattoos and full of themselves, with some money in the bank, a flashy car & tarty girl at their disposal. But is that such a bad profile for a 17-18 years olds whose family education stopped at 13-14, when they left home to join the Academy and spent his teenage years among boys, going from training to school and back?
They might have all dreamt at one point to become the new Hagi, but haven’t we all? :)

Rule number 1 in Romanian football: you don’t mess with the owner!

September 12, 2014 Leave a comment

Romania’s defense held out in Athens against Greece, with Gabriel Tamas at right back, a desperate, yet effective solution. Normally, we should have seen there Alexandru Matel, the 24 years old who featured in both play-off games against Greece last November, when Romania missed out on a place at the World Cup, who went on to finish another solid season with Astra Giurgiu, winning the Romanian Cup and finishing the league in second place.

Don’t look him up in Astra’s team that managed to take out Slovan Liberec and OL on its way to the Europa League group stage! You won’t find him in the starting line-ups, not even on the bench. You can find him in exile though, training on his own, twice a day, on the pitch of Astra’s abandoned stadium from Ploiesti. He’ll be there until next summer, waiting for the last year of his contract to run out, watching international games go by at a perfect age to play and impress.

matelHe’s 24, fully fit, but after just over 100 games for Astra, still naive enough to think that Ioan Niculae, a rich guy who likes to own business and people, would have said: “well, it’s no problem if you don’t want to renew your deal, my team can still do with the best Romanian right back for another year!”. Well, the problem with most of the wealthy guys is that they rarely regard somebody else indispensable, valuable or at least worthy of respect. Other than themselves, that is…

Well, enough bad things about the owner. With all his faults, according to his version of events, he did meet the exact terms requested by Matel’s agent for a contract extension this summer. A scenario Matel didn’t feel the need to deny, which might just make it real. He prefers to pose as the victim, but it would have been a more convincing picture if he didn’t negotiate for a new deal in the first place. And Niculae, as any other rich guy out there, has the cash to surprise you. Usually, in a positive way. At times, in ways you and your agent might dislike. Because in a story that affects not only Matel, but more people and teams, there’s more than just one bad guy involved this time around…

Ce s-a văzut din tribună, la Grecia – România

September 8, 2014 Leave a comment

Că Pițurcă încă mai poată se ne surprindă, deși folosește mereu aceiași jucători. Eu n-am reușit să intuiesc cum se vor așeza cei trei mijlocași ofensivi din spatele lui Marica, de exemplu. Torje, în schimb, n-a reușit să priceapă ce naiba caută pe bancă, acum când are echipă de club care-l joacă, așa cum probabil nu înțelegea cum e titular, deși juca meci de meci pe băncile de rezerve ale unor echipe care-l împrumutau de la Udinese mai mult de nevoie, decât de voie.

photoCă un Tamaș mahmur joacă mai bine decât un Mitroglou trimis pachet înapoi la Pireu, la dezalcoolizare.

Că Bogdan Stancu a început să chelească.

Că între o țață isterică din Orodel și un selecționer agitat din Orodel sunt multe asemănări comportamentale. Explicabile totuși, no?

Că-n tribună doar Iordănescu și Vochin ce mai discută ce se petrece pe teren, folosind mâinile din dotare. Iordănescu îl are în dreapta pe Burleanu, Vochin pe un băiat proaspăt lipit de FRF, căruia i-l arăta la protocol pe Karagounis, iar ăla, săracul, credea că fostul (?) ziarist îl cunoaște inclusiv pe barman.

Că, dacă tot am deschis subiectul, în anturajul naționalei sunt acum niște neni pe care repriza a doua îi prinde în ofsaid, la protocol. Niște neni care strigau “fără fault!”, la dueluri unu la unu petrecute în careu…

Că Marica a învățat la aproape 30 de ani să stea și el pe picioare când e luat pe piept de un fundaș central. Sau că Hoban poate să joace decent la națională și execrabil uneori la Petrolul.  Sau că avem nevoie de mai mulți Pintilii (mai trebuie vreun i?) și Dragoși Grigori (sic!). Că pe Apără Tătărușanu ar putea să-l afecteze titularizarea la Fiorentina.

Că jucăm 4-2-3-1 doar în teorie, practic, ne strângem pe final 11, 10, 9, câți am mai rămas, în careu, și ne rugăm s-o dea adversarii în bară. La propriu și la figurat.

Că la fel de bine am pornit și data trecută, cu 1-0 în deplasare, pe terenul cele mai tari echipe din grupă.

Că Pițurcă a fost, este și va rămâne ultimul selecționer care a calificat România la un turneu final. D-aia, nea Piți trebuie să rămână. Sau, la fel de bine, poate să plece. No?

 

Comeback

August 23, 2014 Leave a comment

Toyed with the idea of letting this go, as the blog’s domain was about to expire, but the passion for writing is still there. So is the will to share info and thoughts on Romanian footie, which lots of you appreciated over time, so here I am. Back on the road, scouting, back on the blog, writing.
Let’s talk some football here, on Twitter (@rbaicu) and Facebook.

Becali stays behind bars, but keeps Steaua as his prisoner

August 23, 2014 Leave a comment

The champions have started in style. No worries in Liga 1, where Claudiu Keseru managed to score six in one game (in theory, Pandurii is one of the decent clubs, but in practice they often try not to upset a top business partner like Steaua) and very few teams will be able to pose a real threat during the current campaign. On the European stage, all going as planned so far and the red and blue outfit are 90 minutes away from another profitable presence in the Champions League group stage, having already a one goal advantage over Ludogorets, thanks to their top performer, Alexandru Chipciu.

So, results are here right away, in spite of the lack of experience of Costel Galca, money isn’t a problem, the fans are behind the team (all over the country). All seems well, especially as in a dozen lines I didn’t mention Gigi Becali. But, oops!, the name is here now, yet the man is still behind bars (alongside his right hand Mihai Stoica), and the problem that could affect Steaua’s promising season arises.
Not only Becali took out of the club’s account a big chunk of the over 10 millions euros profit registered last season, but he also kept a firm grip on the club, seriously restricting Steaua’s movement on the transfer market, where important departures (past or imminent – Tanase and Latovlevici have been repeatedly linked with foreign clubs) need(ed) to be adressed.

The problem is that the club’s structure is poor, it also only exists to approve and execute the owner’s wishes and Steaua’s view of the market is as narrow as the space between two bars. Without Stoica, there’s nobody both informed and confident enough to take an unknown name to Becali, so the club’s recent targets have been only current or past Liga 1 players.
Of the team that battled it out with the likes of Chelsea or Schalke, a handful of key players are gone. With Tatarusanu (Fiorentina), Chiriches (Tottenham), Gardos (Southampton), Bourceanu (Trabzonspor) and Pintilii (Al Hilal), the very backbone of the team was extracted and, in spite of all the income, Steaua failed to add players with either similar quality or at least potential. But the reason isn’t just the reluctance to spend some money. In fact, the Bucharest outfit went after players of proven value, but in the only league Becali knew: the Romanian first division. A league that had already offered its best products to the club in recent years, a league that struggles to produce new talent at a good rate.

That’s why Steaua signed Arlauskis (former league winner with Unirea Urziceni), Luchin (former Dinamo Bucharest player, signed from Botev Plovdiv), Breeveld (Pandurii) and Lemnaru (Universitatea Cluj, a player Galca doesn’t even like). And that is the only reason why the club makes no secret in its intention to bring back to Liga 1 Jeremy Bokila, a striker who impressed with Petrolul, before moving to Terek Groznii. He’s the main and last target once/if the Champions League group stage is reached, although he’s been a flop in Russia and, more importantly, Terek can afford to speculate Steaua’s desperate approach and ask for a lot of money (approx 2 million euros) for a fringe player.

Steaua is definitely weaker than last season, although Galca does some good work on the training pitch, yet the downfall of the solid team lead to important success by Laurentiu Reghecampf might not catch the eye that quickly. The group stage of the Champions League is only 90 minutes away, while the route to another league title remains accessible. A defeat (with the wrong scoreline) in Bulgaria could expose though the fact that Becali was wrong to take away from his club exactly what he’s missing the most: the freedom. The freedom to move, to dare, to act.

We can’t afford to sack the coach, so let’s give him a raise and ask him to think!

June 5, 2014 3 comments

The friendlies against Albania and Algeria were indeed useful. They should have helped some clubs figure out if they should sign free players like Pantilimon, Tatarusanu, Nicolita, Rat or Marica and other clubs if it’s worth spending money for the signatures of Grigore, Pintilii or Tanase (I’d advise them for free against such a move…).

They also helped Piturca introduce some new faces into the team, like the very young Manea of the better-looking-with-each-season Matei, but they probably failed to convince the stubborn coach that this 4-2-3-1 turning into 4-1-4-1 lacks the right players to provide better results than we’ve seen in recent years.

I’ll just lay down my arguments:
– we’ve been searching for years for a right back and all we’ve came up with was Astra’s Matel. The 16 years old Manea is just a promise, while putting Chiriches there (like it happened vs Algeria) simply makes no sense.
– on the left side we have the ageing Rat, now 33, and not even a convincing backup solution in Latovlevici.
– we don’t have a no 8 type of midfielder, apart from PAOK’s Lazar. In front of the defense, Piturca uses Bourceanu and Pintilii; a poor choice, as having there two players with the profile of a no 6 simply keeps your team highly ineffective in keeping possession and building-up he game. Not to mention that their passing skill and vision also affect Romania’s ability to counter.
– we don’t have wingers who can combine pace, skill on the ball, finishing ability. All of them have either one or two of these vital assets. Chipciu, for instance, is one of them… and plays in the middle.
– our wide midfielders are Popa (who only has pace), Nicolita (who only has the will to run), Tanase (who can’t use his left foot and his brain), Maxim (who has skill and some pace, but feels better in the middle).
– we don’t have a number 10 (Chipciu is a winger turned into a supporting forward) or, better said, we don’t want a number 10, because we only counter.
– we don’t have the striker able to play alone upfront. Marica will speculate every once in a while a lucky ball behind the defense or an error from the opposition, but he cannot win aerial duels, hold up the ball, allow the team to come in support. He’s not the right type of forward for such a role.

If any of the above makes some sense, it’s bad. In fact, it’s really bad. Because I am not even a coach. I do, however, judge the players’ performances, ability and potential for a living and I can tell you this: in spite of Piturca’s efforts to promote different players (remember Grozav, who only convinced Terek and in the end failed to make it even there?), Romania’s poor looking 4-2-3-1 gets back at the very players that fail to make it work. And makes them look limited, inconsistent, promising at times, but eventually unconvincing.

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